Sunday, March 29, 2009

MY "BUCKET LIST" OF PILGRIMAGE TRAILS

(Much of the text - and the photos - on this post has been copied from the relative websites. Please visit them for more info.)


I have walked some of the trails on my Bucket List - the Camino Frances 3 times; the Via Turonensis from Paris to Spain; the Via Francigena from Lac Leman to Rome. I would love to walk all 15+ camino trails in Spain and the 7-odd trails in France. But, those are all St Jacques (or Santiago) trails and there are many other pilgrimage trails that I would like to walk one day - before I kick the bucket!

My is my Bucket List of pilgrimage trails to walk:














The Abraham Path


www.abrahampath.org


The Abraham Path is a route of cultural tourism that retraces the journey made by Abraham (Ibrahim) through the heart of the Middle East some four thousand years ago. Three and a half billion people - over half the human family - trace their history or faith back to Abraham, considered the father of monotheism.

The Abraham Path honours this shared cultural heritage by linking into a single itinerary of outstanding interest and beauty the ancient sites association with Abraham and his family.

The centrepiece of the Abraham Path is a long-distance walking trail, beginning in the Turkish city of Sanliurfa, where many believe Abraham to have been born, and in the nearby ruins of Harran, where Abraham is said to have heard the call of God to 'go forth'. Initially covering a distance of 1200 kms the Abraham Path will pass through some of the finest landscapes, historic sites, and holy places of the Middle East before culminating at Abraham's tomb just south of Jerusalem in the city of Hebron/Al-Khalil. Eventually the route will extend to encompass Abraham's travels to and from Egypt, Iraq and Saudi Arabia.


Interesting blogpost on Abraham for history buffs:

http://www.mormonheretic.org/2009/04/02/jewish-muslim-and-academic-perspectives-on-abraham/


Plus, a video/dvd: www.amazon.com/Mysteries-Bible-Abraham-One-Man/dp/B000BF0CNY

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St Francis of Assisi


1) Cammino di Francesco

http://camminodifrancesco.it




There are three different walking trails in Italy connected with St Francis. This one is an 80km trail divided into 8 stops that "..have been blessed by the presence of St Francis." The stops along the walk take you to Medieval Rieti with its palaces and churches, the Greccio, La Foresta, Poggio Bustone and Fontecolombo Sanctuaries set within green and lush woods, the ancient town of Posta and to the top of Mount Terminello.


2) Cammino di Assisi:

www.camminodiassisi.it

















On this 300km route it appears that you are allocated a departure date once you have registered to do the walk. "The Cammino of Assisi follows the footprints of St Francis from Assisi and St Anthony from Padua.Unlike the Camino de Santiago in Spain, where you can decide whenever you want to start your pilgrimage, in Assisi this is not possible because of the limited number of beds now available.Departures will be planned with care to ensure comfortable conditions along the way."


3) The Francisan Route

www.diquipassofrancesco.it



350km from La Verna and the woods of the last hills of Tuscany, to the lovely wide Valley of Reiti in Lazio. Trough the most meaningful sites in the life of St Francis, the hills and valleys of Umbria, the geographical heart of Italy.
The new Guide offers 16 stages, breaking the route into two between Spoleto and Collescopoli, allowing the wayfarer to stop and enjoy the special aura of the ancient Franciscan hermitage at Romita di Cesi.
In spring of 2007 the German edition was published and we are hoping that it will be translated into many more languages.
The credential is issued by the Provincia Serafica dei frati Minori for Umbria.

Another website to download a brochure on a St Francis walk is: http://www.viafrancigenadisanfrancesco.com


On this website you will find a wonderful CBS video on St Francis called, "The Secrets of the Saint"

http://cbs4.com/video/?id=17621@wfor.dayport.com


Q: Why are there 3 St Francis walks - two that practically follow each other from the north?

A: Because the founders of the three routes have not yet been able to work together and each one offers a credential and a certificate if you walk 'their' route.

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ST OLAV'S WAY

www.pilegrim.info


Not long after the Saint King, Olav Haraldsson, fell in battle at Stiklestad in 1030, Nidaros became a popular goal for people seeking to redeem their souls at his shrine. Olav became Norway's patron saint, and his reputation shone far beyond the borders of his country.

The present Pilgrim Way aims to give today's wanderers an idea of what medieval pilgrims would encounter on their way to Nidaros. The path follows ancient, documented trails when these can be used. All along, the path is bound by names of places and historic monuments with links to Saint Olav's life and work.


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THE ST PAUL'S TRAIL:

Turkey - www.stpaultrail.com















The St Paul Trail is a way-marked footpath from Perge, 10 km E of Antalya, to Yalvac, NE of Lake Egirdir. There is a second branch starting at Aspendos, 40km E of Antalya and joining the first route at the Roman site of Adada. The route totals about 500km.

This project partly follows the route walked by St Paul on his first missionary journey in Asia Minor. .. starting at sea level and climbing up to 2200m, with two optional peaks at around 2800m. At the moment there are no signposts on the route (we are looking for a sponsor) but the way-marking is complete. There are also no way-marks on paths through cultural sites.

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The Shikoku 88 Temple Pilgrimage - Japan

www.shikokuhenrotrail.com


There are many similarities with the Shikoku pilgrimage and the caminos to Santiago.

Both started in the 8th C. Both issue a document to be carried by the pilgrim, which is stamped along the way: both offer a certificate at the end; both had a distinctive pilgrim dress which identified ‘real’ pilgrims – long cloak, a walking staff, wide brimmed hat and a scrip or carry pouch. Both experienced a ‘golden age’ of pilgrimage and are today experiencing a resurgence of interest. Many Chinese are walking el camino – and many westerners are walking the Shikoku.


Follow a "Henro" on his pilgrimage here: http://henro2009.blogspot.com/2009/04/day-0.html


Youtube video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjJOpYTOFVE

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Tro Breiz -

www.trobreiz.com















The seven founding saints are venerated in the most celebrated of Breton pilgrimage, the Tro Breiz (tour of Brittany - in Breton). At least once in their lifetime, pilgrims must visit the tombs of the seven saints and the seven bishoprics: Samson at Dol, Malo at Saint-Malo, Briec at Saint-Brieuc, Tugdual at Tréguier, Pol-Aurélien at Saint-Pol-de-Léon, Corentin at Quimper and Patern at Vannes. The route, more than 500 kilometres long, is travelled on foot in 30 days, at a rate of 20 kilometres per day. Each cathedral exposes its relics and receives contributions from the pilgrims. In the XVIth century, more than 30 000 people a year set off on this pilgrimage. Once again in favour, this spiritual and cultural route today allows exploring the religious heritage of Brittany (on foot, by bicycle, on horseback, by car or coach).

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Muktinath - Tibet


www.muktinath.org/links/


The pilgrimage site Muktinath-Chumig Gyatsa is located at 3,750 meters at the Annapurna trekking circuit in the Himalayas of Nepal. It is a sacred site that is shared by both Hindus and Tibtean Buddhists and is a wonderful example of how two religions can share the same site with mutual respect and support.

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For a comprehensive list of over 200 different pilgrimage trails in Europe visit Peter Robins website “The Walking Pilgrim” http://pilgrim.peterrobins.co.uk/routes/details/leona.html



5 comments:

  1. Wow, Sylvia, I love your 'bucket list'! It gives me things to do for a long, long time!
    A very grateful pilgrim :-)

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  2. Not enough time - not enough money - but so nice to know that they are out there for the taking!

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  3. I recently came accross your blog and have been reading along. I thought I would leave my first comment. I dont know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.


    Joannah

    http://easypowerpaint.com

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  4. Thank you Joannah! I hope that, if you ever decide to take a long hike, the blog posts will help you in some small way.
    Hugs,
    Sil

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  5. Hi AMAWALKER!
    Are there any books describing Spanish pilgrimage walks OTHER than the Camino de Compostela?
    Thanks, Bruce

    ReplyDelete